Tags >> History

Pop Quiz Results

Posted by: Sarah Moeck

Tagged in: just for fun , History , FAQ's , Dry Cleaning

Was that too hard of a test for you? Are your brains all fried? Well gird up your loins my friends- it is time for the answers! Check your own papers- lets use the honor system so no cheating all right?

1. B

2. C

3. B

4. A

5. B

6. A

7. C

8. C

9. B

10. C

How did you do? Any major mistakes? Did you prove yourself a fool or one of those lucky enough to really know all sorts about dry cleaning? Either way- thanks for participating and having a little fun with me!

And if you did prove yourself a fool, never fear, there are always ways to make up for that. For instance... there are three wonderful web pages of blog posts that you can look over for a little fun and knowledge :)


April Fools

Posted by: Sarah Moeck

Tagged in: just for fun , History , FAQ's , Dry Cleaning

I think April Fools is a fun day. I used to LOVE it when I was a kit. I would sit for days before trying to think of pranks I could pull on my family and friends. Often times my older brother and I would team up and we did all the usual ones: switching shampoo and conditioner, switching sugar and salt, removing the stopper of a shaving cream can and tossing it into the shower while someone is in there, switching the sticker on the faucet so hot and cold are backwards etc.

It was harder of me to think of something that I could do via the blog-o-sphere. I didn't want to do a prank blog because well, I might get in trouble depending on how upset people got over it. :) So I decided, instead of pranking you, we will just see how smart or "foolish" you might be; about dry cleaning.

I have devised a simple multiple choice test. Take it to the best of your ability and then get back onto the blog tomorrow where I will have posted the answers and see how well you did. (HINT: all the answers to these dry cleaning questions can be found in all of these blog posts! So if you have done your reading you will be good to go!)

Get ready- get set and..... GO!

1. The spot inside of a dry cleaning machine where you put the clothes is called:

a. the clothes hole

b. the drum

c. there is no special spot

2. If you get a stain on a shirt you should:

a. wait. Often times stains will come out on their own

b. wash it. That's what soap is for right? Wash and scrub!

c. soak it if the fabric can stand water, and take it to the cleaners ASAP!

3. Who does Dry Cleaning and Beyond team up with to get you awesome wedding discounts?

a. Your mom

b. Alyssa's Bridal

c. David's Bridal

4. What were the earliest dry cleaners called?

a. fullers

b. fillers

c. Um... dry cleaners... duh

5. What is starch used for?

a. Potatoes!

b. you know... to make things... stiff like

c. to whiten. Its like bleach

6. What kind of stains really say spring time?

a. Grass

b. beer- from all the spring break parties! Woohoo!

c. rain spots

7. How did dry cleaning start?

a. A woman realized her clothes got cleaner when she didn't use water, just natural air

b. it has always existed

c. A man spilled kerosene on his clothes

8. Why does the dry cleaners check your pockets?

a. because your mom does. Its a good practice.

b. finders keepers. What if there is something really good in there?

c. To keep what is in there from ruining your and other peoples clothes

9. What is crocking?

a. when you wear your favorite pair of crocks out

b. when the color of a fabric rubs off

c. What that Australian animal man does... doesn't he have a show?

10. Name on celebrity- whom we have picture proof of- that picks up their own cleaning?

a. Paris Hilton

b. Tom cruise

c. Hillary Duff




Entering the Blogsphere

Posted by: Sarah Moeck

Tagged in: History , Environment

Since our companies birth, Dry Cleaning and Beyond has been fairly successful in entering the modern technological world. We have a new and beautifully desgined web site. We also have a page on Facebook so anyone can become a fan of our company.

We have tried, a little less successfully, to enter the Blogsphere. With our blog we hoped to answer questions not only about our company, but any general information about the services we have become experts in while being in buisness: drycleaning, laundry, wedding dresses and preservation, alterations etc. As well as hoping that we can entertain you as a reader!

We realized that to be able to do this we were going to need someone to update our blog more regularly that had been done in the past. Preferably someone who likes the dry cleaning buisness, and who also really enjoys to write.

So we found Sarah! We would love to encourage you to post comments on the blog or to email her directly and ask any questions or leave any comments, stories, and experiences you would like to see on our blog. You can contact Sarah at sarah@drycleaningandbeyond.com

Stay tuned for future posts and we hope you enjoy reading from us!


The History Of Dry Cleaning

Posted by: Administrator

Tagged in: History , FAQ's , Dry Cleaning

dry_cleaning-historyProfessional garment care dates back to the days of Pompeii when early cleaners were called “fullers”. They used lye and ammonia in early laundering and a type of clay called “fuller’s earth” to absorb soils and greases from clothing too delicate for laundering.

While 1690 is the first published reference to the use of spirits of turpentine for removing tar and varnish from fabrics, it wasn’t until 1716 that turpentine began to be used regularly as a “dry cleaner” for grease and oil stains to supplement wet cleaning processes. Down through the ages, turpentine, a distillation of pine pitch, has had several names: oil of turpentine, spirits of turpentine, camphene, and “turps”.

Even before organic solvent was used to clean garments by immersion methods, the cleaner of clothes was known as a “degrasseur”, a degreaser of textiles able to remove grease and fat stains from cloth. The French name for cleaner was teinturier-degraisseur (a dyer-degreaser). “Degraisseur” was the common term applied to a master dyer who specialized in both dyeing and cleaning garments.

In the early 1900s, dry cleaners began using spirits of turpentine, called “camphene”, as a dry cleaning solvent. This discovery quickly spread to other countries on the continent and later to the British Isles, led by John Pullar and Sons in Perth, Scotland. The new process became known as “French Cleaning”, named for the earlier reputation and fame gained in France. This term continues to be used today to imply that the process is special and requires highly skilled handwork.

The first use of a dry cleaning soap was in Germany. In 1928, Stoddard solvent, which had a higher flash point than other solvents currently being used, was introduced. In 1932, chlorinated hydrocarbons-nonflammable synthetic solvents-were introduced in the United States.

History of Dry Cleaning (part 2)

Posted by: Administrator

Tagged in: History , Dry Cleaning

Dry cleaning uses non-water-based solvents to remove soil and stains from clothes. The potential for using petroleum-based solvents in this manner was discovered in the mid-19th century by French dye-works owner Jean Baptiste Jolly, who noticed that his tablecloth became cleaner after his maid spilled kerosene (paraffin) on it. He subsequently developed a service cleaning people's clothes in this manner, which became known as "nettoyage à sec," or "dry cleaning" in English.

 

Early dry cleaners used petroleum-based solvents such as gasoline and kerosene. Flammability concerns led William Joseph Stoddard, a dry cleaner from Atlanta, to develop Stoddard solvent as a slightly less flammable alternative to gasoline-based solvents. The use of highly flammable petroleum solvents caused many fires and explosions, resulting in government regulation of dry cleaners.

After World War I, dry cleaners began using chlorinated solvents. These solvents were much less flammable than petroleum solvents and had improved cleaning power. By the mid-1930s, the dry cleaning industry had adopted tetrachloroethylene (perchloroethylene), colloquially called "perc," as the ideal solvent. It has excellent cleaning power and is stable, nonflammable, and gentle to most garments. However, perc was also the first chemical to be classified as a carcinogen by the Consumer Product Safety Commission (a classification later withdrawn). In 1993, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) adopted an airborne toxic control measure (ATCM) to reduce perc emissions from dry cleaning operations. The dry cleaning industry is now beginning to replace perc with other chemicals and/or methods. At this time, dry-cleaning was carried-out in two different machines — one for the cleaning process itself and the second to dry the garments.

Traditionally, the actual cleaning process was carried-out at centralized "factories"; high street cleaners shops received garments from customers, sent them to the factory, and then had them returned to the shop, where the customer could collect them. This was due mainly to the risk of fire or dangerous fumes created by the cleaning process.

This changed when the British dry-cleaning equipment company, Spencer, introduced the first in-shop machines (which, like modern dry cleaning machines, both clean and dry in one machine). Though the Spencer machines were large, they were suitably sized and vented to be fitted into shops. In general, three models, the Spencer Minor, Spencer Junior, and Spencer Major, were used (larger models, the Spencer Senior and Spencer Mammoth, were intended for factory use). The cleaning and drying process was controlled by a punch-card, which fed through the "Spencermatic" reader on the machine. Also, Spencer introduced much smaller machines, including the Spencer Solitaire and one simply called the Spencer Dry Cleaning Machine, for use in coin-operated launderettes. These machines resembled coin-operated tumble dryers; to be as small as they were, they simply filtered used perc, rather than distilling it like the commercial Spencer machines. Solvent had to be changed far more frequently as without distillation, it quickly became discoloured, and could cause yellowing of pale items being cleaned. A coin-operated version of the Spencer Minor, which automatically carried out all the distillation and solvent-cleaning operations of the standard version was available but rarely seen, presumably[citation needed] due to its greater cost and size than the other coin-operated machines.

During the 1970s and 1980s, Spencer machines were extremely popular, with virtually every branch of Bollom possessing either a Spencer Minor or a Spencer Junior. Spencer continued to produce machines (introducing new modular and computer controlled models, such as the Spencer Sprint series) until the late 1980s, when the company closed. Spencer machines may still occasionally be seen.

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